Prevent the Continuous Integration build in Azure Pipelines after pushing commit

When configuring your Build Definitions on Azure Pipelines or on Azure DevOps server, you can┬áconfigure a Continuous Integration (CI) build. A CI build runs for every checkin or commit that you make to source control. This allows you to start an automated process that for example compiles and deploys your build. This is a very useful process and it should be ideally setup in the above way. However there are times when you do not want the check-in to trigger a build at all. Continue reading “Prevent the Continuous Integration build in Azure Pipelines after pushing commit”

Working with Tags in Git

To make proper git based workflows, one needs to learn both branching and tagging. While we have discussed git branches in depth in previous blog posts, we have avoided tags till now. Git tags are references that point to specific points in git history. Tagging is generally used to capture a point in the history that may be utilized in future to come back to. However, tags do not change from point, where they were created. So while branches move forward, tags do not. They represent static points in git history.

Some of the examples of tag might be like v0.1, v0.2 etc. Continue reading “Working with Tags in Git”

Make git experience smoother using git aliases

Working with git can be a little intimidating for one since it requires a steep learning curve. Aliases are one of the ways to make git experience more familiar, simpler and easier. It is not necessary that one know them but then can often come handy. Also, you can probably save yourself some time if you also set aliases for long commands. In this short post, we’ll learn on how to use git aliases.

Before we dive into aliases, let’s review the configuration scope in git. Git┬áhas three scopes for configuration: Continue reading “Make git experience smoother using git aliases”

Working with remotes in Git, GitHub and Visual Studio

In previous post, we discussed about how to work with remotes in Git at command line. In this post, we are going to discuss how we can do the same from the very comforts of Visual Studio while we continue to host our source code on the GitHub. While it’s true that there is no command or built-in option available in Visual Studio to connect to GitHub, we can leverage one of the extensions available for GitHub.

Install GitHub Extension for Visual Studio

To search for this extension, let’s open Visual Studio first. From the tool bar menu, select Tools and then click on the ‘Extensions and Updates’:
Continue reading “Working with remotes in Git, GitHub and Visual Studio”

Work with remote in Git to share your code

In last few posts of series of articles on the Git, we discussed several ways to work with code in our local repository. We learned about commits, branches, merge, rebase, stash and whole lot of other commands. If you want to see all those posts, just filter using Git category appearing in left pane in this site. However for most of the time, while working for an complex software, you would be working along with other developers. Therefore, you need a central place where you could host all of the source code and then you need some ability to download/upload your part of the code. This is where in the cloud-based Git repository providers like BitBucket, GitLab, GitHub, Azure Repos etc or On-Premise based Git repository providers like Azure DevOps / TFS, GitHub Enterprise , etc fits in. We already have learned the ability to segregate code for different features/issues by using concept of branches and tags. Continue reading “Work with remote in Git to share your code”