Create Nuget Packages using CI/CD in Azure Pipelines and push to Azure Artifacts feeds

It has been long since I have written blog post about using Nuget Package feeds in VSTS, which can be found here. I have always wanted to write a follow up blog post about how to use feeds further but I was occupied by other priorities and then it fell off my mind. Since then VSTS has been renamed to Azure DevOps and Package feeds are now known as artifacts feeds. However, other than this, most of the things and functionality has been more or less intact in terms of this feature.

For this who are not aware of the Nuget, it is a technology which works on the principal of the package management and very helpful for code sharing in .NET framework and .NET Core based applications. Continue reading “Create Nuget Packages using CI/CD in Azure Pipelines and push to Azure Artifacts feeds”

Configure CI/CD in Azure Pipelines to deploy docker containers as Azure Web App

Few days back, we learned about how to publish Azure Container Instances where-in we can deploy either a container or group of containers and use the same. Azure Web App for Containers allows you to not only run your containers but it also brings forth the PaaS innovations for the Web App. So it brings best of the both worlds together. It also allows you to not worry about the maintaining an container orchestrator mechanism. You can prefer to package their code and dependencies into containers using various CI/CD systems like Jenkins, Maven, Travis CI or VSTS, alongside setting up continuous deployment web hooks with App Service.

In this blog post we’ll learn more about how to deploy .NETCore application packaged as docker container and using CI/CD in Azure Pipelines (Formerly VSTS). Continue reading “Configure CI/CD in Azure Pipelines to deploy docker containers as Azure Web App”

Configure CI/CD for Azure Container Instances using Azure / Azure DevOps Pipelines

Containers are fast becoming the preferred way to package, deploy, and manage cloud applications. Azure Container Instances offers the fastest and simplest way to run a container in Azure, without having to manage any virtual machines and without having to adopt a higher-level service.

Azure Container Instances is a great solution for any scenario that can operate in isolated containers, including simple applications, task automation, and build jobs. Also, Azure Container Instances supports the deployment of multiple containers onto a single host by using a container group aka pods in terms of Kubernetes. Multi-container container groups or Pods are useful when building an application sidecar for logging, monitoring, or any other configuration where a service needs a second attached process.
Continue reading “Configure CI/CD for Azure Container Instances using Azure / Azure DevOps Pipelines”

Troubleshooting ERROR: The subscription is not registered to use namespace ‘Microsoft.ContainerInstance’.

While trying to create the Azure Container Instances on one of the newly created Azure Subscription, we came across this strange error, “ERROR: The subscription is not registered to use namespace ‘Microsoft.ContainerInstance'”. So we checked our configuration and the way we were creating the Azure Containers, and it all seemed okay. So we dig a little around by using PowerShell, authenticate to Azure using Login-AzureRmAccount and fire few commands.

The first command we fired was classic Get-Command to check if there are any existing cmdlets to help with Azure Resources and sure enough, there it was:
Continue reading “Troubleshooting ERROR: The subscription is not registered to use namespace ‘Microsoft.ContainerInstance’.”

Save your changes temporarily in Git using Git Stash

This happens almost every now and then. You are in middle of working on some code changes, modified few files here and there and may be added new files. Now something else comes up urgently and you are asked to do it now. But you do not want to make a commit in middle of the work. In such a case, if you switch branch, your changes are carried over to the another branch as well. So you need a way to save your work temporarily. Fortunately, Git allows this functionality using what is known as Git Stash.

Stashing takes the dirty state of your working directory — that is, your modified tracked files and staged changes — and saves it on a stack of unfinished changes that you can reapply at any time.
Continue reading “Save your changes temporarily in Git using Git Stash”

Configure Code Coverage for Dotnet Core 2.0 based applications using SonarQube and Azure DevOps

Using MSBuild tool to get code coverage and configure Azure DevOps pipelines to include code coverage results is an easy task for .NET framework based applications. Azure DevOps (formerly VSTS) contains inbuilt functionality to analyze code coverage files generated and publish results back to VSTS itself. However, it is quite a challenge to get it right and working for .NET Core 2.0 based applications. In this blog post, we’ll cover steps on how to get code coverage results for .NET Core based application using SonarQube and Azure DevOps. Continue reading “Configure Code Coverage for Dotnet Core 2.0 based applications using SonarQube and Azure DevOps”

Fixing error with .gitignore file not ignoring files

This happens almost every now and then with the developers who are very new to the Git. I’m writing it down in the hope that if somehow the original post on stackoverflow is not available for one or other reasons, people can still find the solution. Also, even after fixing this for multiple times, I do not remember the exact commands, I still end up googling the solution. Sometimes, it takes a lot of time to find the original post as there are so many reasons for .gitignore file not working in intended ways. So the scenario is like this, that you are very new to Git or have some understanding of Git or you are very excited about an idea, you started coding on it, then you initialize and then commit your files. Continue reading “Fixing error with .gitignore file not ignoring files”