Best Practices for Writing Dockerfiles

Over the last few years, adoption of Docker and Kubernetes has grown in leaps and bounds. Vast majority of developers is developing microservices and deploying them into containers. One of the most important aspect that people do not realize is that, the containers needs to be lightweight in nature. Also, while building containers, one needs to account for certain aspects like reducing build time while doing incremental builds, produce images in consistent ways, performing clean builds, maintain them properly, etc. To achieve all this, one needs to follow certain practices while writing Dockerfiles.
Continue reading “Best Practices for Writing Dockerfiles”

Getting started with Windows Containers: In Practice

In previous blog post, we discussed what are windows containers, how they are different from Hyper-V containers and how they are beneficial to developers and sysadmins. We also discussed how Docker as a company has played an important part in the story. In this blog post, we will get quickly get started with installing windows containers and run our first container image by pulling it from docker registry.

Environment Pre-Requisites

  1. You must have a machine with Windows Server 2016 or Windows 10 installed on it. It may be a physical machine or the virtual machine. On the Sku side, you can have either DataCenter version or Standard version as well. Or you may also use Windows Server Core version.
  2. If its a virtual machine, make sure it has nested virtualization enabled.
  3. All windows updates should be installed on the machine.
  4. Administrative access to the machine.

Continue reading “Getting started with Windows Containers: In Practice”

Getting started with windows Containers : Covering Basics

Windows Server 2016 introduced a new feature called Containers. By installing this feature, you can run windows containers on your server. However, these are not Linux-based and they are not related to docker (as in docker software) as well. These containers run on Windows and run Windows on the inside. Also, These conform to the Open Container Initiative (OCI). They allow you to run applications insulated from the rest of the system, within portable containers that include everything an application needs to be fully functional.

The windows containers technology from Microsoft shares many similarities with its Linux counterpart. Both provide an isolated environment for running applications without affecting the rest of the system and without being affected by that system.
Continue reading “Getting started with windows Containers : Covering Basics”