Authenticate to Microsoft Azure while using Terraform

In one of our previous posts, we discussed what is terraform and how we can use install it on the server. Terraform is getting popular day by day to define resource configuration for the applications. One of the providers supported for terraform is Azure Provider which allows one to define Azure Resource configuration using the APIs offered by Microsoft Azure Resource Manager or AzureRM. However, before one can start defining the same, one needs to Authenticate oneself to the Azure. In this blog post, we’ll learn what methods can be used to authenticate oneself against Azure.

1. Configuring the Azure CLI

This method is to be used when one is interactively working with Terraform. Azure CLI or Azure command line interface is a cross platform command line tool offered by Microsoft to work with Microsoft Azure and manage azure resources. Continue reading “Authenticate to Microsoft Azure while using Terraform”

Install Subversion and Create a new source code repository

Subversion needs no introduction to the world of source code management. Subversion is a modern, network-aware version control system. It is an open source project distributed under Apache license by Apache foundation. The open source community has used Subversion widely: for example in projects such as Apache Software Foundation, Free Pascal, FreeBSD, GCC and SourceForge. CodePlex offers access to Subversion as well as to other types of clients. There are other large enterprises where Subversion is the first choice for version control purposes.

Subversion was created by CollabNet Inc. in 2000, and is now a top-level Apache project being built and used by a global community of contributors.

In this blog post, we’ll learn how to download and install subversion and create a new source code repository for us.
Continue reading “Install Subversion and Create a new source code repository”

Getting started with Terraform

One of the core philosophies of the DevOps is to treat everything as code. So it does the same with Infrastructure and treats Infrastructure as Code (or IaC). Treating Infrastructure as Code allows one to deploy infrastructure in a predictable and consistent manner, document all changes, mark each change or a group of change as separate version. So all cloud providers have supported this philosophy in some manner. For example, with Microsoft Azure, you can use Azure ARM templates, for AWS you can use Cloud Formation. However, these days, multi cloud deployment scenarios are becoming common. So instead of learning what each cloud provider supports, one can also learn Terraform.¬†¬† Continue reading “Getting started with Terraform”

Set one reviewer as required out of a group for code review in VSTS

Code review or Peer code review is a well known practice in software development, where code written by one programmer is reviewed thoroughly by his peers. In some cases, it is reviewed by one’s seniors as well. When done correctly, peer reviews save time, streamlining the development process upfront and drastically reducing the amount of work required later of Quality Assurance teams. Reviews can also save money, particularly by catching the types of bugs that might slip undetected through testing, through production, and into the end-users.

When your source code repository is hosted in the VSTS or Visual Studio Team Services, you can choose to made the peer review mandatory by using build policies and also enforce use of pull requests:
Continue reading “Set one reviewer as required out of a group for code review in VSTS”

Install Azure CLI 2.0 on Ubuntu

Azure CLI or Azure command line interface is a cross platform command line tool offered by Microsoft to work with Microsoft Azure and manage azure resources. One can use it in the browser (in the azure cloud shell) or it can also be installed or major Operating Systems of one’s choice. Azure CLI 2.0 is optimized for managing and administering Azure resources from the command line, and for building automation scripts that work against the Azure Resource Manager.

Do note that azure is the prefix for old CLI – Azure CLI (i.e. version 1.0) , and that az is the prefix for the new CLI – Azure CLI 2.0.

In this blog post, we’ll learn how to install Azure CLI 2.0 on Ubuntu machine.
Continue reading “Install Azure CLI 2.0 on Ubuntu”

Getting started with Windows Containers: In Practice

In previous blog post, we discussed what are windows containers, how they are different from Hyper-V containers and how they are beneficial to developers and sysadmins. We also discussed how Docker as a company has played an important part in the story. In this blog post, we will get quickly get started with installing windows containers and run our first container image by pulling it from docker registry.

Environment Pre-Requisites

  1. You must have a machine with Windows Server 2016 or Windows 10 installed on it. It may be a physical machine or the virtual machine. On the Sku side, you can have either DataCenter version or Standard version as well. Or you may also use Windows Server Core version.
  2. If its a virtual machine, make sure it has nested virtualization enabled.
  3. All windows updates should be installed on the machine.
  4. Administrative access to the machine.

Continue reading “Getting started with Windows Containers: In Practice”

Getting started with windows Containers : Covering Basics

Windows Server 2016 introduced a new feature called Containers. By installing this feature, you can run windows containers on your server. However, these are not Linux-based and they are not related to docker (as in docker software) as well. These containers run on Windows and run Windows on the inside. Also, These conform to the Open Container Initiative (OCI). They allow you to run applications insulated from the rest of the system, within portable containers that include everything an application needs to be fully functional.

The windows containers technology from Microsoft shares many similarities with its Linux counterpart. Both provide an isolated environment for running applications without affecting the rest of the system and without being affected by that system.
Continue reading “Getting started with windows Containers : Covering Basics”